Category Archives: D. Thourson Palmer

Ours Is the Storm: Now Available!

Ours Is the Storm by D. Thourson Palmer, the latest release from Boyle & Dalton, is now perf5.000x8.000.inddavailable as a paperback and e-book on all major markets.

Find Ours Is the Storm here.

They held each other for a long time, and just as Ahi’rea was about to cease her Sight and go to the fire, Mother spoke again. “He butchered them. Halkoriv. He butchered Teh’rahin and the others. I’ve never seen anything like it. The dark came from inside him, and it ate them.” Father brushed her hair and held her, but she went on. “The dark came from him and ate them, and when it lifted there was nothing left but blood and bone.”

-Ours Is the Storm

Revik Lasivar knows he is a savior. He knows he will never be defeated. He knows he is fighting for good.

Everything Revik Lasivar knows is a lie.

Revik is the prophesied heir to an ancient power, born to deliver his kingdom. Ahi’rea is the nomad seeress fighting to destroy it. As Ahi’rea leads her warriors to his border, Revik embarks on a last crusade drive them out. When the savior and seeress cross swords, however, the deceptions they uncover will change both of them, and their world, forever.

Ours Is the Storm is a gripping story of betrayal and redemption. From its opening chapter to its thrilling conclusion, this book will keep you immersed in a world of harrowing adventure.

Find Ours Is the Storm on Amazon.com here, or click the icons below to purchase the book from other online retailers.

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Author Spotlight: D. Thourson Palmer

We recently announced that we’ll be publishing D. Thourson Palmer’s debut novel, Ours Isperf5.000x8.000.indd the Storm. We had a chat with Palmer about his creative process, and finding inspiration when writing. Get some insight into this Boyle & Dalton author here, and look for Ours Is the Storm on January 14, 2015.

Interested in becoming a Boyle & Dalton author? Submit your manuscript here. 

B&D: Ours Is the Storm is your first novel. Have you always been a writer? What inspired you to take the leap and write a 350+ page book?

Palmer: Even when I was young I loved books. I remember my parents reading these great, weird Uncle Wiggily stories to me, and my mom always made sure I had a book near at hand. I found a massive box of old books in the garage once, including a set of the 1960s editions of Lord of the Rings. They were in terrible shape and I put them back together with scotch tape, and they’re still on my shelf. From the time I could hold a pencil I used to write and illustrate little stories – even before I could write. They were just marks that were as close as I could get to words, filling pages of notebooks I kept around. I started longer stories and novels time and again throughout school, but it wasn’t until college and after that I started finishing stories in between classes. Ours Is the Storm somehow just kept getting longer until it was done.

B&D: What’s the writing process like for you? Do you find it easy to write, or are you forcing hands to keyboard like most of us?

Palmer: I wouldn’t say easy, but one thing that does come to me is the freedom to be crappy. Just to write, and write poorly, and fix it later. That may have come from OITS too, as when I started on it I didn’t really know what I was getting into. I didn’t start with much of an expectation or plan for it. Something else that helps is writing longhand. I write everything in pen on paper first, because it’s too much work to go backwards and edit. My work rate plummets when I’m typing. I spend way too much time fixing and adjusting individual words or agonizing (futilely) over phrasing. When I’ve got an empty notebook and a pen, though, there’s nowhere to go but forward.

B&D: What was your inspiration for OITS? I know you’ve done some traveling–did you channel any of those experiences into your writing?

Palmer: Definitely. At the time I started OITS, I was assistant-teaching English at a high school in Japan. Being pretty far out of my element, being unable to speak to most people, that was something that made it into the book. Learning about other people, other places, and comparing those things to what I always thought I knew but didn’t. Feeling lost. Actually getting lost. I got stuck on a mountain climb once while the sun was coming down, a good couple hours from anything, again in a place where I could barely speak to anyone. This was also around the time it began to occur to me that a lot of my life wasn’t going to be what I had long thought it would, but that didn’t mean it was going to be bad. Just different than expected.

B&D: Which character was the most fun to write?

Palmer: I think Tak’la ends up a lot of people’s favorite, and he’s hopeful and good and all the best things. He’s a stupendous fighter, and I like writing kick-ass fights. I liked some of the side characters the most, characters that aren’t always in the fore. Draden was fun, oddly enough. The Rider was fun to write. Rahi’sta surprised me, I started her in as an aside and she just kept coming back or poking herself in where she hadn’t been before.

B&D: Why did you decide to go with a hybrid publisher like Boyle & Dalton instead of seeking a traditional publisher?

Palmer: I like the idea of working in the community. I’ve been a lot of places but I love Columbus, and I want to see good things come from this city. Collaborating with individuals, instead of some conglomerate or committee or whatever, that’s awesome. I like being able to get away from dollar signs and tell the stories I want, the way I want, and indie and hybrid publishers like Boyle & Dalton are part of that ability. Ursula K. Le Guin spoke at the National Book Awards recently (also, go read The Left Hand of Darkness, I command it), and she said we need “writers who know the difference between the production of a market commodity and the practice of an art.” I don’t know if  can put myself in the latter camp, but I want to.

B&D: Do you have any advice for first-time authors who have just completed a manuscript?

Palmer: Don’t stop now. Do it again.

B&D: What are you working on next?

Palmer: I tried to overturn or examine some fantasy tropes in OITS while still staying in the genre, and that was fun, so I’m working on a tragic, heroic family saga, set in Feriven, like OITS. The next book follows three generations of the heroic Warden family, and mostly it’s them doing their best and everything going awfully wrong. It’s about watching these heroes and really getting into the insanity that would be part of their lives. All the violence, the loss, the expectations – there’s a little bit of work out there where the heroes have to deal with that stuff, but not a lot.

Ours Is the Storm will be released to all major retailers on January 14, 2015. Interested in becoming a Boyle & Dalton author? Submit a manuscript for review here.